American Osteopathic Association

Advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine


 Learn About Osteopathic Medicine


 Find a DO


 What is a DO?

DO treating patientDid you know that there are two types of physicians in the United States? DOs and MDs. Both are fully-qualified physicians licensed to prescribe medication and perform surgery - but DOs bring something extra to the practice of medicine.

Find out about the DO difference

 What is Osteopathic Medicine?

DO treating patientOsteopathic medicine is one of the fastest-growing segments of health care in the country. Osteopathic physicians, or DOs, practice a "whole-person" approach to health care and receive special training in the musculoskeletal system.

Learn more about the complete care DOs provide

 About Your Health

DO treating patientNothing is more important than the health of your family. When it comes to staying informed about health topics and conditions, the AOA should be "your home for health." Our Health Conditions Library provides information and tips to help you stay healthy.

Browse the Health Conditions Library

 Becoming a DO

DO treating patientOsteopathic physicians are trained to look at the whole patient and integrate them into the health care process as a partner. Because of this whole-person approach to medicine, more than 60% of all DOs choose to practice in primary care.

Learn more about becoming a DO

Stay Up To Date - Allows authors to create links that can be grouped and styled.  Stay Up To Date

Meetings and Events
News and Publications
AOA Leadership and Policy

Advance Your Career - Allows authors to create links that can be grouped and styled.  Advance Your Career

Continuing Medical Education
Professional Development

Advocate for DOs - Allows authors to create links that can be grouped and styled.  Advocate for DOs

Raise Your Voice
Advocacy Efforts

 Health Talk and Turkey


ThanksgivingAs the holidays approach, consider asking relatives tactfully about your family's health history. It's critical information to share with your physician, who can work with you to create a plan for staying healthy.



 What's for Dinner? Try Breakfast


Girl drinking a smoothieBreakfast staples like omelets, oatmeal with nuts, and fruit smoothies are quick and easy options for a weekday dinner. Plus, you'll aid your digestion by eating a light meal in the evening instead of consuming lots of calories right before bed.