American Osteopathic Association

Advancing the distinctive philosophy and practice of osteopathic medicine

Research Funding Opportunities

AOF Research Awards

The Am​erican Osteopathic Foundation (AOF) assumed management of the AOA Research Awards in 2006. Visit the AOF's website at www.aof.org and search under "Grants and Awards" for current information on making nominations for these awards.

Funding Opportunities for Residents

​​​​​​National Institute of Health

IHS Loan Repayment Program Application Cycle   

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Indian Health Service (IHS) is accepting applications for its Loan Repayment Program (LRP) for health professional education loans in return for full-time clinical service in Indian health programs. The IHS LRP, authorized by Section 108 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (IHCIA), will be awarding up to $40,000 per awardee in exchange for a two-year service obligation to practice full-time at an Indian health program site. After completing the initial two-year contract, recipients may annually request an extension of the contract for an additional one-year service commitment. 

Application materials can be found online at http://www.ihs.gov/loanrepayment

For a complete list of eligibility requirements, including IHS-approved health profession degree program, please visit: https://www.ihs.gov/loanrepayment/lrpbasics/

For questions, please contact Jacqueline K. Santiago, Chief, IHS LRP, at (301) 443-3396 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday.

Department of Health and Human Services: Rapid Assessment of Zika Virus (ZIKV) Complications (R21)

The purpose of this Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) is to provide an expedited funding mechanism for research on Zika virus (ZIKV) and its complications.

ZIKV is a single-stranded RNA virus of the Flaviviridae family. It is transmitted to humans primarily through the bites of infected Aedes mosquitos, though both perinatal/in utero and sexual transmission have been reported. Initially discovered in 1947, it has been reported in the Americas since 2014, with a major outbreak in Brazil starting in 2015. This disease is seen in about 20% of infected people and is usually self-limited. However, a possible association between ZIKV infection in pregnant women and severe microcephaly in their babies has been very concerning and prompted the World Health Organization to declare this potential complication a public health emergency. Additionally, the virus has been found in blood, fueling growing concerns about the risk of transfusion transmission with particular concern over severe outcomes in at-risk transfusion recipient populations such as women who are pregnant.

Applications are accepted on an ongoing basis. More details about the FOA can be found here: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-106.html.

 

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